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Tag Archives: Cornerstone Family Medicine

Dr. Polo Shirt Makes a House Call

I’ve had a wonderful streak of unmedicated hospital births lately.  Strong mamas and papas who were prepared and thoughtful about their births.  

I learn so much from each birth.  My latest birth was unusual–days of prodromal labor, slow progression with intense contractions.  We were laboring at home when Dr. Polo Shirt (you’ve read about him before here and here) stopped by the house to see how we were doing!  What a great encouragement to this family for their doctor to step onto their turf, validate their progress, and then leave them to their privacy to continue laboring.   

[Let me interject here:  if you are pregnant, live in the area, and are planning a hospital birth, you will not find care like this anywhere else.  I won’t promise you’ll get a house call, but I do promise you’ll be surprised by the personal care you’ll receive.  I’ve seen many doctors in the delivery room.  Trust me.]       

I won’t go into all the details of this birth but I’ll sum up with:  beautiful baby, happy mama, and proud papa. 

I’ve also loved that all my recent births have involved immediate skin-to-skin contact with babies left on mama’s chest for at least the first hour.  That sounds like such a reasonable request but sometimes it is so difficult to get in the hospital setting.   

Now I’m lounging beach-front at Hilton Head.  Lazing the days away for a little while.  And I must turn off the ‘puter to take my tot swimming!

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Elizabeth’s Hypnobirth

[Shared with permission]

 

On February 18, 2008, I donated blood at the local blood connection.  I randomly asked the phlebotomist, “What happens if you give blood and you are pregnant?”  The response was, “You may miscarry?”.  Well, you can guess that I took a test the next morning, February 19, 2008.  I took a pregnancy test at 6:30 am, 7:30 am, 8:30 am, and 9:30 am.  Interesting they all said that same thing, pregnant.  I told my husband that night by putting a pregnancy test in the bottom of a chocolate tin.  I told him I had something sweet for him. What an exciting time!  We are going to be parents. 

 

On June 9, 2008 we found out we were having a girl, wait, no a boy.  The technician was in training and misread the ultrasound initially. Yeah, a little drummer boy.  What a blessing to see a life growing inside you.  Every precious flutter, kick, and roll made me more aware that I was going to be a mommy.   clip_image0021

 

We had a lot of decisions to make.  One conversation was taken care of for us, finances.  On March 7, 2008, we became debt free thanks to prayer and God’s gift of teaching to Dave Ramsey.  The next were labor options and support.  We wanted no medical intervention so I needed to find different ways to deal with the pressure waves of labor and delivery.  We tossed around the idea of a birthing doula for some time.  I loved the concept, but pride stepped in.  My independent self didn’t want any help. My husband, the free spirit, stated that you only give birth once to this child and the doula would help us both, especially him.  He had a great point since I was more nervous about his response during labor and delivery than my own.  Luckily I had a friend, Julie Byers, that is a doula so I automatically felt comfortable.  I also wanted to integrate hypnobirthing.  My employers contract psychologist, Dr. Wood, did sessions with several fellow employees that swear by this self-hypnosis technique.  You use your natural instincts to bring about a safer, easier, more comfortable birthing experience.  Hypnobirthing is incorporating deep relaxation techniques where some mothers report little or no pain.  Dr. Wood is very limited about what clients he takes on, but prayerfully I was one of them.  Last was our OB and hospital.  In the beginning we put no thought into where to birth and what doctor, but after seeing five of the OB’s at Highlands Center for Women and taking the Greenville Memorial tour, we were very troubled.  We received a negative vibe with these places because they advocate medical intervention and we were afraid that our birthing plan would not be carried out at these facilities.  My doula recommended Dr. Stafford and Greer Memorial. I was nervous about a male doctor since I had never seen a male doctor and I was also nervous about the drive to Greer in the urgency of labor.  After much prayer and research, we felt a peace that we cannot explain so we decided to change facilities.

 

The due date was set for October 24, 2008 and when that date rolled around and no baby, we became very disappointed, but what a time to reflect on God’s goodness.   We were taught patience and trust as this little baby was 13 days post due.  On the night of November 5, 2008, I was admitted to the hospital and was scheduled to begin the induction at 6:00 am on November 6, 2008.  I kept telling everyone, that he would come on his own.  My husband and I prayed and prayed he would.  I was told if I went into labor before 6:00 am, they would cancel the pitocin.  At 5:30 am, I started having contractions at 4-5 minutes apart lasting a minute.  I told Russ to call our doula.  When they checked me, I was at 4 cm. The pitocin was canceled.  Thank you for answered prayers and what timing, thirty minutes before the dreaded pitocin. 

 

100_2860What an amazing gift we have in our bodies.  God has equipped us as women with everything we need to give birth.  It is not a medical emergency, but a natural process.  I learned to trust my body that day.  I never stayed in the bed.  I moved around the room, laboring on the birthing ball, in the tub, hands and knees, and even on the toilet and leaning against the rods in the bathroom.  I learned to trust others that day.  My support team was amazing.  My husband stood by me the entire time.  He sensed my needs through every pressure wave.  This time of intimacy was like no other. 

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Our doula, was there to lead us through everything.  She was very knowledgeable about natural labor and delivery, hospital procedures, and non-medical interventions (counter pressure, aromatherapy, etc).  Julie would continually encourage us and the staff to stick to the birth plan.  My doctor, Dr. Stafford, was like no other doctor.  He is aware of the normality of birth and really has his patient’s best interest in mind.  He encouraged me while I labored and pushed.  He even helped hold me up while I pushed in the squatting position.  He stuck to our birth plan and made sure that the nurse did as well.  The nurse, Tammy, was great even though you could tell she was out of her comfort zone as she is used to her patients having an epidural, pitocin and staying in bed. She was open to our needs and that is what patient care should really be.   
 

After 9 ½ hours of labor and 40 min of pushing we welcomed Elijah Russell Chapman to the world.  He weighed 7 pounds 15 ounces and was 20 inches long.  He was beautiful, perfect.  What an honor to be trusted with one of God’s children.  I experienced a feeling like no other that day, instant love.

 

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Special thanks to all the people who helped make this experience perfect.  You will never be forgotten.

 

I hope I do not offend anyone by my birth story. That was not my intention.  The great thing about being parents is you have the opportunity to make your labor and delivery however you wish.  You have to decide what is best for you and your baby. We all have the same goal and that is a healthy baby. We may just arrive there differently.

 

In awe of the gift of life,

 

Elizabeth

 

The Gamut

Two back-to-back births that ran the gamut.  One striking difference was the OB management of delivery. 

Dr. Masked Man:  He showed up only when baby was crowning.  He involved a surgical tech who draped the mom’s legs and torso in blue sterile paper.  To hold her legs, I had to fight with the ridiculous paper and I did get “the look” from the tech when I rubbed the mom’s thigh over the paper.  The dr. wore a surgical mask, a face shield, a scrub cap, long gloves, full scrubs, and boots.  It could have been anybody under that getup!  The surg tech kept pouring soapy water on the mom without warning and scrubbed her down with antiseptic.  The room was bright and filled with people.  When baby was born, dr. immediately clamped the cord.  Baby was held up (for the photo shot maybe?) and then handed to a nurse for twelve million footprints and procedures.  Then dr. applied strong cord traction for the placenta. 

Dr. Polo Shirt:  Wore casual “street clothes.”  Called the mom by name.  In fact, he called all of us by name.  The room was dim and the only other person was the nurse.  When baby was born, dr. handed her to the mom.  He patiently waited for the cord to stop pulsing while the mom breastfed.  Cord clamped (and cut by me–my first!), mom cleaned up, and dr. patiently waited for the placenta.  He quietly respected the postpartum time by slipping out of the room.  He came back later to quietly bid us all goodnight.   

Which would you choose?  And how would a newly pregnant mom know to even ask the questions to find the right choice?