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THE breastfeeding podcast

Caryn–this post is partly a response to your request for milk supply musings.  Enjoy! 

Diana West, IBCLC, is my breastfeeding guru.  She wrote the book Defining Your Own Success and co-authored The Breastfeeding Mother’s Guide to Making More Milk.  She created a website for women who are breastfeeding after breast reduction surgery and a website for low milk supply.

Last year, I listened to a two-part podcast of Diana West discussing milk supply issues.  I listened to it again this weekend and remembered how wonderful it is!  She begins with a concise explanation of the biology of feeding before jumping into the specifics of galactagogues and treatment plans for problems.  While most women will not experience a biological or surgical supply issue, many women do find themselves with low or dwindling supply due to a lack of understanding about breastfeeding. 

I recommend this podcast for moms-to-be, nursing moms, and birth professionals.  It is free to listen online or download via the Motherwear Breastfeeding Podcasts on itunes.

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4 responses »

  1. On the opposite end, do you have any suggestion for a mom with incredibly overabundant supply? She’s able to get 11 oz (pumping) in 5 minutes and when she nurses, her babe about drowns in the amount of milk coming out. Her LO is about 4 weeks old but spent 2 weeks in the NICU so they’ve really just started BF. While in the NICU the mom pumped and the baby got milk through a tube.

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  2. Oddly–on the low milk supply site, I was just reading the section on oversupply. Maybe pass along some of the info found there? http://www.lowmilksupply.org/oversupply.shtml The idea is to control the forceful ejection without increasing supply. So the oft recommended strategy of pumping before nursing is ultimately counterproductive.

    Wow…11oz in 5 minutes! Later on, when she’s settled into nursing and parenting, she might consider donating milk to premature and critically ill infants through a place like the National Milk Bank. It is free. And they take care of sending a nurse to take a blood sample for screening, sending you a pump if needed, and sending dry ice packaging/bags/shipping containers for mailing your milk off. http://www.nationalmilkbank.com.

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  4. thanks Julie! a girl I know is having issues w/ her 4th little one (keep in mind this woman is the anti-nurser “it’s yucky”) but she asked if I would pump for her! so I have to re-establish my supply. I’ll let you know how it goes- this poor baby is being trained up and -oh I could go on and on. horrid.

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